Ride & Handling

The Grand Vitara has independent front and rear suspensions, which remains the exception among offroad vehicles, but I didn't find the ride particularly carlike. The firmness is more like a conventional truck's, and both I and some of my colleagues rate it on the low end of compact-SUV comfort. My test car had the standard 16-inch wheels and thus taller tire sidewalls, so it's possible the optional 17-inch wheels and lower-series tires (standard on the Luxury trim level) would be firmer still.

In terms of handling, the Grand Vitara feels reasonably grounded for an off-roader, but it's not sporty. The suspension allows for some sideways hop when cornering on rough pavement. At 36 feet, the turning diameter is decent, especially compared to the Honda CR-V, which needs almost 2 feet more, even with front-wheel drive. That said, the Grand Vitara's driveline noticeably binds when you turn with the steering wheel turned all the way. Not to say it's damaging itself, but it doesn't feel right.

See also:

Instrument Light Brightness Control
Instrument Light Brightness Control Your vehicle has a system to automatically dim the instrument panel lights when the ignition switch is in the “ON” position and the lighting switch is tur ...

Equator RMZ-4, Quay and Quad Concept Vehicles
Designed to match Suzuki's performance-oriented motocross motorcycles, the RMZ-4 concept offers rugged off-road performance in a Crew Cab. This Equator-based concept, built by the Carlab of Orange ...

Interior
Only those opting for four-wheel drive will get all of the Equator's interior frills. The RMZ-4 package includes chrome trim on the instrument panel, more adjustments in the driver's seat and upgr ...

Copyright © www.suzuguide.com